Mar 13, 2010

Wannabe Writers #7

Wannabe Writers is my weekly meme. It's a writing group for the un-published and anyone is welcome to join. It's a place where future authors can ask questions, share stories, and get feedback. Click (here) to find out how it works. 

Where I am in the writing process: I've been writing since November 2008. I am currently starting a brand new writing project. (50,000 Words, 50 Days) I finished my first 1,000 words yesterday and things today have been going smooth enough, I anticipate reaching 2,000 words in another hour or so.

My current problems: Starting new is always tough. Yesterday I went through 3 different beginnings and wanted to pull my hair out. Eventually, I had to just say "Whatever. If it sucks, it sucks." But still, figuring out what step A is in the beginning can be tough. You may have a wonderful idea--but no clue where to jump into your story at.

My question this week: How to get going in the beginning? Suggestions on ways to start a story?

11 comments:

Crystal Cook said...

Beginnings are tricky. I think it's a good idea to start with a scene that involves some kind of action that shows a key emotion with my character. Something that kind of sets the stage for what they're going to be going through for the rest of the book. Obviously we know this is where we need to hook the reader, so I think if you can start that emotional connection between reader and your character here, you have a good start.

Amanda said...

The way I do beginnings is such an organic process, finding the right place in my head before I can ever start on paper. I wish I could be of more help...

Jen said...

Beginnings are the hardest for me. I normally just start writing in the middle and as I'm writing I realize the beginning, one of these days maybe I'll start at the beginning!!

Stevie said...

Beginnings hare extremely hard for me, so I normally try to outline them. I've never been much of an planner until recently but I'd always try to outline the beginning before starting a project.

Swimmer said...

Umm. my answer is on my blog post but it isn't very good I don't really have anything to say on this topic

J. Kaye said...

Who says you have to start at the beginning? You can start anywhere in the story you want. :) This is the first draft. Organization can come later...lol.

Robin of My Two Blessings said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Robin of My Two Blessings said...

How to get going at the beginning? What I've done is outlined, brainstormed and thought about the story before even staring them. Writing it in my head the night before as I go to sleep works really well for me.

I'm glad you are doing this and decided to join in. I need all the help I can get.

InABox said...

I just start writing. This probably isn't conducive to your 50 day challenge, but you can always go back and add to the beginning or decide that you want to change directions. Brainstorming on paper is another good way to start.

I hope the challenge is going well!

E. Elle said...

I always have trouble with beginnings. If it's not starting out well, I immediately determine the rest won't go well, so I give up. I have learned, though, that if the story really has merit and the characters really want their story told, a new beginning will form in my mind and it will take off from there. My current novel had nine false starts. I'm now into chapter three. It's taken a lot more time than I anticipated but sometimes more time is what you need to get it right.

Good luck with the 50,000 words challenge!

Aubrey said...

Do you mean how do we get ideas--that kind of beginning? For me, those are usually off-shoots of theoretical conversations w/ my husband that I continue to play out in my head.

But as for the beginning of a story--I never write that first. It's too hard. I try to start out w/ some kind of action, mainly because my writing tends to be moody, thinky, slow. I need a bang first for anybody to be willing to put up w/ that. ;)

But I do think the first 50pp--before the reader cares about the characters or the details of the plot--should be page-turners whenever possible. That's when you catch them or you don't.